Safety Council

Engage Estero Safety Council is made of volunteers serving as a voice for the citizens of greater Estero on safety and transportation priorities and issues. We advocate for related solutions to Village, County, and State Government organizations.

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Traffic on Corkscrew Road – Traveling East Corkscrew Road. Is it Safer?

Traffic on Corkscrew Road – Traveling East Corkscrew Road. Is it Safer?

East Corkscrew Road had improvements in 2014/2015 to help with traffic, but it was not enough. Lee County Department of Transportation (LDOT) collaborated with the developer as the Wild Blue Estero, FL development was planned and approved. LDOT required the Wild Blue east entrance to line up with Bella Terra Blvd.

In 2018, with road impact fees, LDOT installed a traffic signal at Bella Terra Blvd and Corkscrew Road. In April 2021, East Corkscrew Road widening, Phase I (Ben Hill Griffin to the east border of Bella Terra) started. As the Rivercreek development was planned and approved, working with LDOT, their entrance was aligned with the west entrance of Wild Blue. In 2023, the Rivercreek developer, GL Homes, worked with LDOT to fund a traffic signal. There is still hope the Wild Blue community will pay their fair share, as the warrants are not there for LDOT to fund a traffic signal.

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The State of Development: GECR Quarter 3, 2023

The State of Development: GECR Quarter 3, 2023

September 2023 Greater Estero Community Report Our 3rd GECR provides an essential update on the various building developments that will likely be scheduled in greater Estero over the next few years, together with an update on what changes we can expect regarding our...

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Environment Council

Engage Estero Environment Council is a volunteer group focusing on improving water and air quality and mitigating and eliminating the effects of climate warming in greater Estero.

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Health Council

Engage Estero Community Health Council comprises health* and safety-minded volunteers who think about community health comprehensively with a common desire to improve the overall health of the citizens of greater Estero.

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Your Healthcare Actions for 2024

Your Healthcare Actions for 2024

Health: Your Healthcare Actions for 2024                  In the early part of the New Year, taking stock of your health and the actions you should consider to help minimize your reliance on physicians and other healthcare...

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What helps to enhance Longevity?

What helps to enhance Longevity?

What helps to enhance Longevity?During the recent Engage Estero Community Meeting on January 25th at the Estero Recreational Center, Jodi Walborn, Blue Zones, and Policy Lead discussed the thought-provoking but realistic insight into what we can do to increase our...

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Education Council

Engage Estero mobilizes volunteers in our schools, sponsors scholarships, and promotes the involvement of the community through announcements and public forums.

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Updates on Issues of Impact

Engage Estero believes the best way to get a community involved is to make sure they are aware of the issues impacting their future, and know how to impact those decisions before they are made. We conduct and publish original research and articles aimed at getting residents Engaged.

groceries
We’re now a few weeks into the pandemic, and those groceries you managed to binge-buy a month ago are dwindling. It’s time to restock the pantry.
But what should you buy this time around? And what’s the secret for keeping food fresher longer? Although you can still go to the grocery store if you need to, you still might be a little hesitant or find that some items are in short supply.
Time to concentrate on the essentials and develop a grocery list that fits your budget and still satisfies your family’s appetite and health needs.
Lee Health Solutions is here to help. Julie Hill, a registered dietitian with Lee Health, offers some tips for meal planning that will help stretch your food dollar and reduce the stress of grocery shopping during COVID-19.
First, in the land of plenty there’s plenty of food to go around.
“Food production and manufacturing are widely dispersed throughout the U.S. and there are currently no widespread disruptions reported in the supply chain,” says the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The agency is keeping an eye on that supply chain for any changes, too. So, go ahead and make that list!
Plan for all the people in your household, Hill advises.
“And when you do, write out that plan. Take pen to paper,” she says. “This will help you stick to it and help you keep within your budget. It’s too easy during times of stress to make impulse purchases of foods that offer comfort but may not be healthy for you and your family.”
Essential foods: These vital foods include protein (unprocessed meat, fish/tuna, beans, tofu), fruit and vegetables, starches and grains, nuts and seeds, and healthy fats such as avocados and olives.
“Choose fresh or frozen items as much as possible and buy canned and packaged foods you regularly use. But avoid purchasing non-essential foods,” Hill says. “These include soda, alcohol, desserts, sweets, processed or fried snacks, and flavored or carbonated water. They can be expensive and non-nutritious.”
Freeze meals: When you make a fresh meal, plan for making a double batch and freeze the leftovers in glass or reusable containers. This approach will help you save money and offer you relief when you don’t have the energy to cook.
“The meal should contain a vegetable, protein source, and sometimes a carbohydrate or starch, although sometimes it’s best to omit the starch/carbohydrate and make it fresh while you thaw out the rest of the meal,” Hill says. “Plan for complete meals specifically for freezer, such as soups, stews, spaghetti sauce, and curry.”
Tips for keeping perishable food longer:
Eat the foods you’ve purchased based on spoilage, Hill says.
“Eat fresh vegetables or prepared foods first. Heartier vegetables and fruits can last in the refrigerator longer,” she notes. “Freeze protein foods if you’re concerned about spoilage before you can cook it.”
To keep illness-causing germs at bay, Julie also recommends that you follow the FDA’s four steps for perishable items: clean, separate, cook and chill.
Lee Health Solutions’ Registered Dietitians are offering phone consultations. If you need help meal planning or how to shop for the family, call 239-424-3120.
And, as always, when shopping remember to follow the safety precautions of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to help keep you, your family, and others safer.