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Village of Estero Meetings

19 Jun
9:30 am
03 Jul
9:30 am
09 Jul
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Safety Council

Engage Estero Safety Council is made of volunteers serving as a voice for the citizens of greater Estero on safety and transportation priorities and issues. We advocate for related solutions to Village, County, and State Government organizations.

Latest news…
Driving Safety is Everyone’s Responsibility!

Driving Safety is Everyone’s Responsibility!

One of the major causes of vehicular accidents is distracted driving. We have entered the “100 Deadliest Days” - the period between Memorial Day and Labor Day when fatal teen crashes increase dramatically. Parents are the best line of defense to ensure a safe ride!...

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Corkscrew Road: What is going on, and when?

Corkscrew Road: What is going on, and when?

Corkscrew Road: What is going on, and when? (Written by Mark Novitski, Consultant to Engage Estero) Updated May 2024 Corkscrew Road Updates Corkscrew Road Widening – Jump to: Ben Hill Griffin to the East side of Bella Terra East side of Bella Terra to Alico Road Three...

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Environment Council

Engage Estero Environment Council is a volunteer group focusing on improving water and air quality and mitigating and eliminating the effects of climate warming in greater Estero.

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Health Council

Engage Estero Community Health Council comprises health* and safety-minded volunteers who think about community health comprehensively with a common desire to improve the overall health of the citizens of greater Estero.

Latest news…
The “Skinny” On Obesity

The “Skinny” On Obesity

By Robert P. Belin, M.D. Chairperson, Health and Wellness Breckenridge, Golf and Tennis Club, and member of Engage Estero’s Health Council For the first time, the FDA has approved medication for weight loss! So, why is this important and in the news non-stop? It’s...

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Education Council

Engage Estero mobilizes volunteers in our schools, sponsors scholarships, and promotes the involvement of the community through announcements and public forums.

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Updates on Issues of Impact

Engage Estero believes the best way to get a community involved is to make sure they are aware of the issues impacting their future, and know how to impact those decisions before they are made. We conduct and publish original research and articles aimed at getting residents Engaged.

Speed kills

For those of a certain age, the phrase “speed kills” may have many connotations. But today, we’re talking about the (literal) impact of increased speed limits on pedestrian injuries and deaths.

A 2011 study by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety, looking back at prior similar studies with update data, concluded:

Results show that the average risk of severe injury for a pedestrian struck by a vehicle reaches 10% at an impact speed of 16 mph, 25% at 23 mph, 50% at 31 mph, 75% at 39 mph, and 90% at 46 mph. The average risk of death for a pedestrian reaches 10% at an impact speed of 23 mph, 25% at 32 mph, 50% at 42 mph, 75% at 50 mph, and 90% at 58 mph. Risks vary significantly by age. For example, the average risk of severe injury or death for a 70‐year‐old pedestrian struck by a car travelling at 25 mph is similar to the risk for a 30‐year‐old pedestrian struck at 35 mph. 

Why is that important? Because we regularly have drivers complain that lower speed limits are frustrating… I guess because it takes them two seconds longer to get down your average block. However, if that average block is also used by pedestrians and cyclists, a higher speed limit can bring a higher likelihood of injury or death.

That’s not factoring in how much over the speed limit most drivers typically drive… so if a 20 mph limit really means, say 25 mph, raising that even just 5 mph can double the likelihood of injury or death to pedestrians or cyclists. (That’s also not looking at vehicle design and its impact on injury, a topic for another day.)

So when you hear a clamor from motorists to raise speed limits even a moderate amount, remember that decision has consequences for people who walk or ride amidst those faster-moving vehicles. And if you ride or walk on those roadways, remember that the patience you show behind the wheel can be paid back when you’re a more vulnerable user of that thoroughfare.

Featured in BikeWalkLee newsletter from August, 2021